Quantum mechanics provides, to date, the most accurate understanding of the microscopic world of atoms, molecules and photons. Its success is striking and has given rise to vast applications, from nuclear magnetic resonance to the transistor, from the laser to the most accurate GPS.
Besides being undeniably successful, quantum mechanics is equally undeniably weird. It allows putting a microscopic system in the superposition of two different, perfectly distinguishable configurations at the same time. The law that makes such a case possible is the quantum superposition principle, arguably the most fundamental statement in quantum physics.
The validity of quantum superposition principle at the microscopic level has been confirmed by an enormous amount of very accurate experimental data. However, is this valid only when we consider such elementary quantum systems? Everyday experience seems to suggest so: The macroscopic world that is before our very own eyes seems to elude the richness of quantum superposition states. Why don’t we see them behaving quantum mechanically?

 

Everyday experience seems to suggest so: The macroscopic world that is before our very own eyes seems to elude the richness of quantum superposition states. Why don’t we see them behaving quantum mechanically?
TEQ will address such a fundamental quest from an innovative standpoint, supported by a € 4.4M grant awarded by the European Commission. A small particle will be levitated within a well-controlled environment, with low temperature and low vibrations. In such an environment an indirect test of the quantum superposition principle can be performed, by analysing carefully the noise that affects the centre of mass motion of the trapped particle. The measured noise will be compared to theoretical predictions from different models - some of which assume a breakdown of quantum linearity.
The ambition of the project is to establish the ultimate bounds to the validity of the quantum framework, if any.


   Latest News and Activities

Activity - Friday, February 2, 2018

TEQ officially starts on 1st January 2018. To kick-off the project, a meeting with all partners will take place on 2nd February 2018 at the University of Trieste.

News - Thursday, June 15, 2017
TEQ is one of only 26 funded proposals out of 374 submitted.

“The panel considers this proposal to be of excellent quality […] Research methods and approaches developed within this project will provide grounds for further developments in other fields where high precision measurements are required.

News - Monday, January 16, 2017
The TEQ project is submitted for the call H2020-FETOPEN-1-2016-2017.

TEQ will establish the large-scale limit of quantum mechanics by pursuing a novel research programme.